The verger by somerset maugham summary

Foreman then goes on to start a successful business on his own and continues to be happy with what he has. Years after, when he is at the bank to sign papers, the banker is surprised to learn Foreman can't read despite his enormous success.

The verger by somerset maugham summary

Somerset Maugham we have the theme of appearance, opportunity, dedication, independence and humility. Taken from his Collected Short Stories collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator and after reading the story the reader realises that Maugham may be exploring the theme of appearance.

He prefers to keep it for weddings and funerals. Considering it more appropriate to wear the new gown for these occasions. This may be important as Maugham may be suggesting that appearance is important to Albert Edward.

Similarly the vicar seems to think appearance is important too. Things like being able to read and write set a standard that the vicar believes everybody should attain. This may also be significant as it suggests that the vicar believes that the ability to read and write reflects on the good character of St.

As a representative of St. He does not have the skills that the vicar thinks a verger must have. Maugham may also be exploring the theme of opportunity. Rather than being downcast about the fact that he has lost his job. Albert Edward turns his loss into an opportunity by deciding to set up a tobacconists and newsagents.

From defeat Albert Edward manages to grasp victory and eventually owns ten shops. Which in many ways shows the dedication that Albert Edward has. It is this same dedication that had previously made him a successful verger. Once focused Albert Edward appears to throw all his energies into whatever effort verger or shop owner he is undertaking.

It is as though Albert is driven not by profit but by a desire to be the best that he can be. Someone who appears to be aloof and disconnected from those around him.

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What the vicar considers to be important is not necessarily the same for others. Something that is noticeable by the fact that Albert Edward resigns his position from the church. Though some critics might suggest that being a verger is an important role in the church.

That it has an element of prestige.

The verger by somerset maugham summary

It is not the same as being self-sufficient something that Albert now is with his ten shops. From being answerable to others the vicar Albert Edward has become his own boss. Answerable to nobody but himself. Which is a dramatic change in circumstances for Albert Edward and again it is probably important to remember that Albert Edward achieved everything he has without being able to read or write.

If anything Albert Edward has been an underdog throughout the story.William Somerset Maugham () is a well-known English novelist, short-story writer, playwright and essayist. He is famous for his clear and precise style of writing.

THE VERGER. by W. Somerset Maugham. There had been a christening that afternoon at St. Peter's, Neville Square, and Albert Edward Foreman still wore his verger's gown.

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Quick Answer

W. Somerset Maugham's story "The Verger" is set in a small church in which there has recently been a change in vicars. (Vicars were the local priests of a parish who performed most tasks of the. In The Verger by W. Somerset Maugham we have the theme of appearance, opportunity, dedication, independence and humility.

Taken from his Collected Short Stories collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator and after reading the story the reader realises that Maugham may be exploring the theme of appearance.

The verger by somerset maugham summary

Summary. Foreman had been the assistant (verger) to several priests who worked in St. Peter’s parish. He was most dedicated to his work and kept the purity of the work (he was next to the priest in offering prayers, etc.) He was a good man.

He had worked for sixteen years when a new priest took duty of the church.

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